Bone Stock and Gut Health

 

The study below found some significant facts regarding health effects of certain food.  This is an attempt by us to interpret the findings so that it could be implemented in everyday health practices.  It has to be understood that good eating habits are necessary for optimal health and that means that a variety of good foods have to be consumed every day.  We do believe that some food has medicinal value and could be used to help in the prevention and support of treatment in certain illnesses.  However, if it is not part of a good nutritious diet, it might lose its value.    Although we do believe in the power of natural food, we absolutely do not claim to cure any disease through the consumption of specific food

 

Koutroubakis IE, Petinaki E, Dimoulios P, Vardas E, Roussomoustakaki M, Maniatis AN, Kouroumalis EA.  Serum laminin and collagen IV in inflammatory bowel disease. J Clin Pathol. 2003 Nov;56(11):817-20.

 

This study looked at the concentration of collagen in two groups of people.  The one group consisted of healthy people while the other group had a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).  It was found that the levels of collagen were lower in the patients with IBD.  Although this study was done to determine collagen levels as a possible marker for IBD, it does give us support for the reasoning that collagen is a contributor to gut health.  

Spilling the Guts on Gut Bacteria

The studies below found some significant facts regarding health effects of certain food.  This is an attempt by us to interpret the findings so that it could be implemented in everyday health practices.  It has to be understood that good eating habits are necessary for optimal health and that means that a variety of good foods have to be consumed every day.  We do believe that some food has medicinal value and could be used to help in the prevention and support of treatment in certain illnesses.  However, if it is not part of a good nutritious diet, it might lose its value.    Although we do believe in the power of natural food, we absolutely do not claim to cure any disease through the consumption of specific foods.

 

Drekonja D, Reich J, Gezahegn S, et al.  Fecal Microbiota Transplantation forClostridium Difficile Infection: A Systematic Review of the Evidence [Internet].  Washington (DC): Department of Veterans Affairs (US); July, 2014

 Our interpretation:

We found this gold nugget for foodies in the health literature.  It is a review article.  That means it reviewed all the relevant and significant articles in the literature and summarized the new knowledge provided by them into one more digestible (pardon the pun) article. 

This study looked at people suffering from CDI (Pseudomembranouscolitis), which is an antibiotic-associated inflammation of the colon linked with an overgrowth of the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. diff).  The disease causes amongst other unpleasant symptoms, diarrhea.  Specifically, the study compared treatment with drugs to treatment with fecal transplants.  (i.e. feces from a donor with healthy gut bacteria).

The results have shown the following:

Treatment with the donated feces led to a large proportion of patients experiencing short-term resolution of symptoms.

The combined reported success rates were higher with fecal transplants than those reported for various medical therapies (even when medical therapies were combined with fecal transplants).

There were no serious adverse reactions to the fecal transplants. This was not the case for the drugs used in the treatment of CDI.

Although this treatment is not in the scope of practice for any nutritionist, the truth often becomes clear in the extremes.  Apart from warning against the careless use of antibiotics and other drugs, this article shows the importance of gut bacteria.  To us, it is specifically an encouragement to include a broad spectrum of probiotics (bacteria which live in our colon) in the diet and avoid all practices which destroy the balance of bacteria in the colon.  The latter includes antibiotics, contraceptives, chlorine, antacids and many more chemicals.  In the rare instance you do have to take drugs, make an effort to include food and supplements to protect your gut bacteria.  Food which contain probiotics include yogurt, kefir, kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha, aged cheeses, pickles and many more.  

Honey, Ginger and Colon Cancer

The studies below found some significant facts regarding health effects of certain food.  This is an attempt by us to interpret the findings so that it could be implemented in everyday health practices.  It has to be understood that good eating habits are necessary for optimal health and that means that a variety of good foods have to be consumed every day.  We do believe that some food has medicinal value and could be used to help in the prevention and support of treatment in certain illnesses.  However, if it is not part of a good nutritious diet, it might lose its value.    Although we do believe in the power of natural food, we absolutely do not claim to cure any disease through the consumption of specific foods.

 

Analhuda Abdullah Tahir, Nur Fathiah Abdul Sani, Noor Azian Murad, Suzana Makpol, Wan Zurinah Wan Ngah and Yasmin Anum Mohd Yusof Combined ginger extract & Gelam honey modulate Ras/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathway genes in colon cancer HT29 cells.  Nutrition Journal 2015 14:31.  DOI: 10.1186/s12937-015-0015-2

Hakim L, Alias E, Makpol S, Ngah WZ, Morad NA, Yusof YA.  Gelam honey and ginger potentiate the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU against HCT 116 colorectal cancer cells.  Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention: APJCP [2014, 15(11):4651-7.  (PMID:24969899)

 

Our interpretation:

These studies on the effect of honey and ginger on colon cancer cells were done in a petri dish.  Although I do not eagerly jump to conclusions from petri dishes to human bodies – I did think that this was promising enough to post here.

Two studies reported the same results when the efficacy of ginger and or honey was tested on cancerous colon cells.  In both the studies it was found that both honey and ginger on their own lead to the death of colon cancer cells.  However, when these two foods were combined the effect of on the cancer cells was even greater.

Honey and ginger are not only anti-cancer foods; both also possess powerful anti-inflammatory action.  Inflammation is now widely recognized as a risk factor in the development of cancer and other auto-immune diseases.  Although the ways differ in which dry and fresh ginger works in the body, the effect is very much the same.  

I think it is safe enough to at least try using both honey and ginger if you have colon cancer or may be at risk to develop it in your life.  The article published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention (mentioned above) claims that this will also be supportive of chemotherapy.

Two ways to get this power combination into your body are steeping a tea from ginger root sweetened with honey or simply mixing dried ginger with honey.  If the taste of the honey and dry ginger mix is not appealing, stir it into probiotic Greek yogurt.

Choose the darkest honey possible as it contains extra anti-oxidants to provide you even more benefit.  Alternate it with raw honey which is lighter in colour but have enzymes which have extra health benefits.